Roatán Groupers

What species of groupers can you see in Roatán and the Bay Islands?

There are approximately 150 different kinds of groupers in the world. Thirty-seven species are known to spawn in the Caribbean including the waters throughout the Bay Islands.

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        GROUPER

      • Class: Actinopterygii
      • Order: Perciformes
      • Family: Serranidae
      • Subfamily: Epinephelinae
 

Here is a list of the most common groupers that can been seen diving in the Bay Islands: BLACK GROUPER - NASSAU GROUPER - RED HIND, ROCK HIND - TIGER GROUPER - GRAYSBY - YELLOWFIN GROUPER - YELLOWMOUTH GROUPER - CONY - GOLIATH GROUPER

Most grouper species are coastal demersal fish, which means they usually live and eat near the sea floor. They are not designed for long and fast swimming. Some groupers can be quite large, and measure over a meter.  The huge Goliath grouper can grow up to 8.2 feet (2.5 m). Others, like the Graysby, can be as small as 7 in (17 cm).

All varietals of groupers are opportunistic predators, they eat a wide variety of foods. While they prefer to eat fish, they often eat crustaceans and invertebrates like octopus and squid. Since they don’t have many teeth, they swallow prey rather than biting them. They use their big wide mouths and powerful gill muscles to create a strong suction that can suck the designed victim even from a distance. Some species prefer to ambush their prey, while other species are active predators.

Groupers are mostly monandric protogynous hermaphrodites. They are born and mature as females but they have the ability to change their sex for reproduction purposes. Black groupers are very easy to spot while others, like the Goliath grouper are more difficult to find. 

Groupers can live quite long. Scientists estimate they can live up to 50 years, sometimes even longer.

What species of groupers can you see in Roatán and the Bay Islands?

There are approximately 150 different kinds of groupers in the world. Thirty-seven species are known to spawn in the Caribbean including the waters throughout the Bay Islands. Here is a list of the most common groupers that can been seen diving in the Bay Islands: BLACK GROUPER - NASSAU GROUPER - RED HIND, ROCK HIND - TIGER GROUPER - GRAYSBY - YELLOWFIN GROUPER - YELLOWMOUTH GROUPER - CONY - GOLIATH GROUPER

Most grouper species are coastal demersal fish, which means they usually live and eat near the sea floor. They are not designed for long and fast swimming. Some groupers can be quite large, and measure over a meter.  The huge Goliath grouper can grow up to 8.2 feet (2.5 m). Others, like the Graysby, can be as small as 7 in (17 cm).

All varietals of groupers are opportunistic predators, they eat a wide variety of foods. While they prefer to eat fish, they often eat crustaceans and invertebrates like octopus and squid. Since they don’t have many teeth, they swallow prey rather than biting them. They use their big wide mouths and powerful gill muscles to create a strong suction that can suck the designed victim even from a distance. Some species prefer to ambush their prey, while other species are active predators.

Groupers are mostly monandric protogynous hermaphrodites. They are born and mature as females but they have the ability to change their sex for reproduction purposes. Black groupers are very easy to spot while others, like the Goliath grouper are more difficult to find.

Groupers can live quite long.
Scientists estimate they can live up to 50 years, sometimes even longer.

 

 

Image

        GROUPER

      • Class: Actinopterygii
      • Order: Perciformes
      • Family: Serranidae
      • Subfamily: Epinephelinae
 


NASSAU GROUPER (Epinephelus striatus)

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Nassau is probably the most well know grouper, thanks to its unique pattern and body color. It is known to change from tawny, for the ones living in shallow water, to pinkish, red, or sometimes orange-red for specimens living in deeper waters. Nassau grouper has been overfished for years and is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

Nassau Groupers can live up to 29 years. They can be found offshore on rocky reefs and drop offs. Juveniles can most commonly be seen in shallow water on the nearshore reefs.  

      • MAX SIZE: 3,5 ft (100 cm) 
      • MAX WEIGH: 55 lbs (25 kg)     
      • DEPTH RANGE: 20 - 426 ft (6 - 130mt)

NASSAU GROUPER (Epinephelus striatus)

Nassau is probably the most well know grouper, thanks to its unique pattern and body color. It is known to change from tawny, for the ones living in shallow water, to pinkish, red, or sometimes orange-red for specimens living in deeper waters. Nassau grouper has been overfished for years and is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. 

Nassau Groupers can live up to 29 years. They can be found offshore on rocky reefs and drop offs. Juveniles can most commonly be seen in shallow water on the nearshore reefs.